Gwalior : A peek into glorious history

One more weekend getaway, unplanned trip but not solo, this time I went with few of my friends.

On Friday 23rd September, after my regular office hours, I called one of my friends in Gurgaon and asked him about his weekend plans. He was available and a couple of his friends were leaving for a trip next morning to Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh; we decided to tag along. They had confirmed Return Train tickets and Hotel Booking, and my friend and I had to book ours. Normally it’s almost impossible to get last moment tickets in Indian Railways (Especially on weekends). To our surprise, we got two confirmed tickets from New Delhi to Gwalior in Bhopal Shatabdi and in Same Coach (Bingo!!!!). ☺

Leaving Delhi at 6 am; we were travelling in then India’s Fastest Train (Bhopal Shatabdi) and it took only 3 hours and 30 minutes to reach Gwalior covering the distance of around 350 Kms.

We reached Gwalior at 9:30 am, and checked into a Hotel (near to railway station).

We had some rest there and left for City tour at around 01 pm, we walked from Hotel to a nearby Market and had lunch at “Indian Coffee House”; then booked a taxi for Gwalior Fort.

We reached Gwalior Fort at around 3pm, it was hot there, and temperature was around 30-35 degree Celsius that time.

We Booked a Guide and entry ticket from the main gate of Fort and entered into the fort.

Gwalior Fort is an 8th-century hill fort near Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, central India. The fort consists of a defensive structure and two main palaces, Gujari Mahal and Man Mandir, built by Man Singh Tomar. The fort has been controlled by a number of different rulers in its history. The Gurjari Mahal palace was built for Queen Mrignayani. It is now an archaeological museum. The oldest record of “zero” in the world was found in a small temple, which is located on the way to the top. The inscription is around 1500 years old.

It took around 3 hours to see the fort properly with the help of Guide.

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

 

At around 6pm we came out from the fort and had some Tea and Snacks at Main Gate of Fort.

Then, we came to know about the Light and Sound show, which is organized by State Government on daily basis in English and Hindi (one hour each). We booked the tickets of the first show, it was in Hindi at around 7:30 or 8pm. We were having around 1 and half hour free before the show.

We utilized that time by visiting nearby “SAS BAHU Temple” and Very famous “Scindia School.”

Sas-Bahu ka mandir, or Sahastrabahu Temple, is located to the east of Gwalior Fort. Built in 1092 by King Mahipala of the Kachchhapaghata dynasty, this temple is one of the greatest architectural marvels situated by Gwalior Fort. It is 32 metres long and 22 metres at its breadth. This temple mainly has three entrances from three different directions. In the fourth direction, there is a room which is currently closed. The entire temple is covered with carvings, notably 4 idols of Brahma, Vishnu and Saraswati above its entrance door.However, limestone erodes over time, and soon portions of the limestone fell, later spurring conflict as to whether it was a Jain temple or a Hindu temple. Then, Captain H. Kolar and Major J.B. Kint completely removed the limestone and restored the temple completely.Then again we came to fort and enjoyed the “Light and Sound show.” It was good to watch that.

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

After that we came to our Hotel, had dinner and took rest.

Next Day Sunday (25th September) after having breakfast from Hotel we went to “Jai Vilas Mahal.”

The Jai Vilas Mahal, also known as the Jai Vilas Palace, is a nineteenth-century palace in Gwalior, India. It was established in 1874 by Jayajirao Scindia, the Maharaja of Gwalior and is still the residence of his descendants the former royal Maratha Scindia dynasty. 

It is a fine example of European architecture, designed and built by Sir Michael Filose. A combination of architectural styles, the first storey is Tuscan, the second Italian-Doric and the third Corinthian. The area of the Jai Vilas palace is 12,40,771 square feet and it is particularly famous for its large Durbar Hall. The interior of the Durbar Hall is decorated with gilt and gold furnishings and adorned with a huge carpet and gigantic chandeliers. It is 100 feet long, 50 feet wide and 41 feet in height.

Supposedly, eight elephants were suspended from the durbar (royal court) hall ceiling to check it could cope with two 12.5m-high, 3.5-tonne chandeliers with 250 light bulbs, said to be the largest pair in the world.

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

After exploring “Jai Vilas Palace” we went to Gujari Mahal.

Gujari Mahal museum was built by Raja Man Singh for his wife Mrignayani, a Gujar princess. She demanded a separate palace for herself with a regular water supply through an aqueduct from the nearby Rai River. The palace has been converted into an archaeological museum. Rare artefacts at the museum include Hindu and Jain sculptures dated to the 1st and 2nd centuries BC; miniature statue of Salabhanjikaterracotta items and replicas of frescoes seen in the Bagh Caves.

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

 

PHOTO: AMIT PALLATH

 

PHOTO: YAMAN GOGIA

 

After two days of awesome historical trip to Gwalior, we reached Gwalior railway station at around 07:30pm to board our returning train to New delhi.

Gwalior is the city of royals, majestic forts and a glorious past which in combination makes it a place worth exploring.

I would like to mention the names of my friends who went to Gwalior with me Vartin Jain, Amit pallath, Yaman Gogia & Saatvik Sethi.

 

 

 

All the Pictures in the post are copyrighted. Their reproduction, even in part is forbidden without the explicit approval.

 

 

 

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